The Will to Win

“Winning isn’t everything; it’s the only thing.”
Perhaps the adage exemplifies how sports changed in thelatter half of the 20th century. Attributed to UCLA coach Henry Russell Sanders and/or Americanfootball coach Vince Lombardi, the saying exemplifies how professionally sportsbegan to be taken post 1950s.
There was a clear shift from the Olympic spirit from thenon, which preached us that ‘The most important thing is not to win but to takepart, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but thestruggle ‘. While the Olympic spirit gave us a ‘chance to celebrate our sharedhumanity’, Sanders and Lombardi taught us how to be ‘winners’.

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Are we paying heed?

“Stunning beaches on The Great Ocean Rd.. Gorgeous drive!!”
The above lines appeared on the micro blogging site twitter, on England cricketer Kevin Pietersen’s page, couple of hours before he was fined for speeding in Australia. Pietersen was driving a Lamborghini sports car.
Naturally, the incident made headlines. For Pietersen is a star player for his team and commands huge respect among cricket followers in the world, as his twitter posts are followed by more than hundred thousand fans. To top it all, not many would have forgotten the innings of 227 he played to down Australia, making his team earn a lead in the Ashes series.
For media, it was news worthy of a headline.
Cut to another incident.
25-member Nepali women football team left for Dhaka to participate in the SAFF Women´s Football Championship. Some notable TV channels ignored to cover the story, forget making it a headline. The news appeared in print and on online portals, sans fanfare.
It should be interesting here to mention that the team has a sizeable number, 9 players from the team that managed to secure the runners up position in the last edition of South Asian Games. Yet the hoopla was missing.

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